Jerica's Live.Work.Play Platform

#OneCobb




Snapshot of Our County Government


0

Commissioners in Cobb County

0

Cities in Cobb County

0

School Board Districts

0

County Employees

0

County Funds ($millions)

0

Community Improvement Districts

The Board of Commissioners, the School Board, and City Government


No More Closed-Networking

There exists a difference between collaboration and networking. Collaboration involves truly working together for an objective and involves multiple parties. Many decisions made by our elected officials usually happen in a private room, off the record. While there is a time and a place for such discussion to occur, it is important that decisions on broad-impact projects should not be solely announced, but rather collectively developed. In today’s world, only those that have been exposed to how government works are involved. As a representative, it is an imperative that I meet people where they are.

Connecting Governing Bodies

Our Cobb delegation has much to be proud of, but we can do a better job in our transparency on roles, and creating opportunities for collective impact. In today's world, our planning commission and school board could collaborate more for more effective zoning. We can improve on planning assumptions such as the role that transient homes play in the broader ecosystem. We can coordinate to create grants, tax districts, and a pipeline for innovative pilots that could be modeled around metro Atlanta. Simply put, relationships matter and by proactively engaging in IGAs, there is so much that can be accomplished for the people we serve.

Increased Accessibility

Being a representative means being accessible to the community you are serving. Town halls should be dialogues, meetings should include mutiple layers of government, representatives should be able to help answer questions, and identify new ways to build relationships within the community. They should also serve as your representatvie to higher levels of office so that individuals should not have to compete with sanctioned lobbying firms with large bank accounts. Your representative should be willing to listen and be a real ally in making sure your concerns are heard. This is the culture I intend to bring to the Board of Commissioners.




What are the benefits to a Connected Government?

01
Save Taxpayer Money

When governing bodies are able to coordinate, we can leverage economies of scale, and prevent costs associated with overlapping/uncoordinated construction. Also, when coordinated, we can have better accounting of inventory so as not to spend costs associated with due diligence done by multiple groups.

02
Reduce Time to Completion

When coordinated, projects can be conducted more smoothly, and fewer delays caused by a lack of information.

03
Increased Accountability and Accuracy

Uncoordinated projects can result in loss of accountability for project completion and a lack of accurate timelines and costs. By coordinating governing groups and incentivizing collaboration, we can demand accountability for owning parties, and from third parties. Through coordination, we can also ensure that there are less chances of having a negative impact to a community.






FYI: Who Does What in Our County?



"OneCobb is about having a vision and a united front about how we can serve as a model for Metro Atlanta. It begins by having our school board, board of commissioners, and city government correspond on one page when it comes to planning intiatives. It also takes coordination with state and federal level government in order to bring resources back into the county. To accomplish that, it takes respect, collaboration, and relationship. When we can do these things, there is so much that can be accomplished."

Jerica Richardson
Candidate for Cobb County Commissioner

3Ps of Public Service




Snapshot of Public Safety


0

Number of Departments in Public Saftey

0

(%) Decrease in Crime Rates

0

($K) Average Salary for Police

0

(%) of Fires Contained within Room of Origin

0

Per Capita Spending on Police and Fire Protection

0

Number of Community Programs

The Board of Commissioners and Civil Service


Proper Compensation (Pay)

Many of our public safety professionals work tirelessly, but have to pick up additional jobs just to make ends meet. We can all admit that good police work is not charity, and with higher pay, we can demand and maintain a higher quality staff. Pay should not just reflect time in service, but should also include the quality and consistency of training, experience, and impact to the community. As a part of compensation, we must incorporate new ways of supporting, acknowledging, and rewarding our public safety professionals.

Also, compensation also goes beyond recognition and salary. We can also ensure that our professionals have up-to-date training and technology to help improve their quality of life and safety. Every day when they leave the house, their families are on edge about whether they will return.

Community Engagement & Activities (Presence)

The shift we must accomplish is protecting and serving by reinforcing community. Reinforcing our community means our public safety professionals should have a more active role to play within the community beyond protection. In order to better integrate with the community, foster recruiting efforts, and improve the perception and effectiveness of the job, it is imperative that public safety professionals are encouraged to participate in community engagement workshops, local school activities, community service projects, and remain out front at community events (festivals, conferences, etc.). There should be a component of the job by which the community can provide feedback as well. We should not wait until a problem arises.

Working & Training in Collaboration with Social Programs (Partnership)

Our public safety department has partnered with other groups to conduct successful training programs for crime prevention and de-escalation. I am committed to strengthening such relationships in the areas of job-training, rehabilitation, engagement, de-escalation, crime prevention, leadership training, drug use, and trafficking. By establishing a relationship where the community and social professionals can provide information to our servants while our elected officials are able to empower our residents and visitors, we can foster a much safer community with better outcomes.

In addition, I am fully committed to decriminalizing certain non-violent activities and focusing on the rehabilitation and reacclimation of those that have been arrested.

Lastly, jails or detention centers that hold non-convicted persons should not include punishment-style behavior. Today, we are facing conditions that are well-below what would be considered humane. Poor quality water, sleep deprivation, lack of food, and limited administration of healthcare has led to the deaths while in custody. This is unacceptable, and I am committed to seeing this change, but the tone must change at the top. If we truly believe in innocence until proven guilty, then we must practice it. We must protect the rights of people, especially while in our custody.






Enforcing a Sense of "Community" through Public Safety Measures

Independent studies have identified a series of recommendations in order to ensure that our public safety professionals are positioned for success. Listed below are several recommendations highlighted in the studies. I am looking to listen and learn from our professionals managing CCPD and identify ways to navigate these recommendations.






Changing Our Relationships

Reemphasize community policing as a department strategy

Engage a co-production police model

Establish a formal role for the community/citizen advisory committee




Changing Our Priorities

Acknowledge and address public perception of racism and discriminatory policing

Prioritize criminal investigation staffing

Prioritize patrol staffing

Review and revise CCPD approach to traffic enforcement

Collect race contact and outcome data

Develop a LGBTQ+ policy




Changing Our Methods & Incentives

Increase pay for employees

Expand rewards and community incentive programs for employees

Review and revise the performance appraisal process

Ensure full and consistent staffing of public service technician positions

Increase mid and upper-level management training

Engage a more interactive and inclusive leadership style

Review disqualification policies and practices

Reinstitute the "Knock and Talk" philosophy (off-the-clock community engagement in neighborhoods)

Not identified in CCPD assessment, but important nonetheless: Expand the use of technologies that increase accountability and safety




"Our public safety professionals have the important role of protecting and serving our community through the enforcement of laws and maintaining peace. It is a difficult and honorable job that many times serves to inspire. I am calling up on public servants to go one step further than the enforcement of laws, and that is to reinforce community. We can get there through pay, presence, and partnership efforts as we move into the future."

Jerica Richardson
Candidate for Cobb County Commissioner

Improving Mobility Options




Snapshot of Our Mobility


0

(%) Workers Commuting 30 Minutes or More

0

(%) Walkability Index Score in Comparison to Peers

0

(min) Average Travel Time

0

(%) loss in Economic Opportunity Due to Limited Mobility

0

(%) Drive Alone

0

Miles of Roads Being Managed

The Board of Commissioners and Mobility


Expanding Transit Options and Intelligence

Transit is more than just a conversation about the car. I am committed to having a conversation about expanded transit options and increased mobility. This means the end goal is to ensure that people from different communities can get from point A to point B in equitable, cost effective, and efficient ways. County-wide mobility means improved education opportunities, community engagement initatives, and sensible economic development. We also want to ensure we are leveraging the most user-friendly, sustainable technology that will improve our mobility as well.

Connecting Less Dense Areas to High Density Areas

Here in Cobb, we are experiencing growth and there are some areas around the county where that growth is more concentrated. In order to maintain that balance, it is necessary that we deploy measures that help build connections between less dense and high density areas. Internally, we can leverage trolleys and park and rides in less dense areas and commuter/light rail and buses in high density areas.

Engage & Enact Regional Plans

Cobb County and the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) have developed an incredible 2040 plan which include a focus on regional connectivity. We have to make some tough decisions if we are to make it into reality. Mobility is a conversation about connecting ourselves internally, but also externally to other counties and nearby cities. If we are not thinking of Cobb as a part of a major artery in the region, then our economic viability will decrease dramatically.




Starting the Transit Conversation

When it comes to maneuvering from point A to point B, we have many options that we can consider. From today's current technologies to those of the future, our plans must be comprehensive.


Swipe to View Ratings

From One Place to Another

Mobility Winners-Building Connections









Connecting to Fulton County

Mobility Options Under Consideration

Light Rail


Managed Lanes


Express Lanes


Connecting Internally

Mobility Options Under Consideration

Trolley


Sidewalks


Buses


Reversible Lanes


Two-Lane Tributaries


Sky Tunnels





Accommodating the Costs

MARTA expansion costs nearly $300M/mile which cannot be supported by either a TSPLOST or special tax district. Note, the technology is older, and there may be opportunities in testing new forms of transit. Regardless, in order to connect Cobb to Fulton, we must get creative by investing in new technologies and expanding our tax base.

Jerica's Stance on the Tax Increase
Learn More About the Budget and Expanding Our Tax Base

TSPLOST by referendum

Can bring an extra $150M to special transportation projects.

Limitations to Consider:

Most projects will benefit denser areas, while funding would also be supplied from less dense areas. Projects would have to focus on contributing tributaries by incorporating alternative forms of transit and the arterial routes.

HB930 Special Tax District

Can support local transit projects

Limitations to Consider:

Projects that benefit denser areas, but funding coming from less dense areas. Projects would have to focus on contributing tributaries by incorporating alternative forms of transit AND the arterial routes.

A portion of the county would have 7% tax while other areas would have a 6% tax, leading to incentivized sprawl and possible density changes in central and northern Cobb.






ARC and Cobb County's 2040 Vision for Transit and Growth

Read the full plan here.



Governing Agencies

Decisions about transportation are done in conjunction with many parties.

Georgia Department of Transportation

Cobb Department of Transportation

Cobb County Commissioners

ATL DOT

ATL Board

Georgia Legislative Delegation

Federal Department of Transportation

Atlanta Regional Commission





Leveraging 21st Century Transit Options


Technologies we are watching:

Expanded broadband infrastructure

Autonomous Cars, Shuttles, and Buses

Tunnel-based Transit

Water-fueled Cars

High-speed Rail

Maglev Trains

Transport Pods

Multi-purpose Vehicles (Commerce, delivery, transit)

Drone Delivery Technologies






"With its abundance of parks, attractions, economic centers, low cost of living, and access to Atlanta, Cobb County has much to offer. However, without being able to get to where you need to be at the right time, it's only going to be harder for us to show up for economic and social opportunities."

Jerica Richardson
Candidate for Cobb County Commissioner

Zoning & Economic Development




Snapshot of Our Community's Economy


0

($K) Average Weekly Wage

0

(%) Unemployment Rate

0

($K) Median Household Income

0

(K) Employed Population

0

(+%) Difference in Cost of Living in Comparison to US Average

0

(%) Households with Internet Access

The Board of Commissioners and Economic Development


Equitable Revitalization (Gentrification-Proof Measures)

Balancing revitalization, growth, and gentrification is a delicate balance. By encouraging mixed-use and mixed-income zoning, transitional housing, subsidized funding for code upgrades, and incorporating an income-based tax credit for rapidly rising property values, gentrification can be mitigated in a meaningful way and members of the community that had been there prior to redevelopment can benefit from the changes.

Regional Development & Planning

The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) and our planning commission have drafted a 2040 plan which includes a study of local and regional trends. The plan provides economic development priorities, transit plans, and goals for every area of service for the county. I am committed to enabling and adhering to this plan as we move into the future. It is also an imperative that we evaluate our planning goals through the lens of leveraging new technologies and expanding specific areas of our economy: new industries (Research & intellectual property (IP)), industry collaboration, professional services, recreational activities, and tourism.

Smart Communities

SMART Communities is about enhancing the services being offered by the county and empowering the users of those services. I am committed to leveraging the SMART Communities arsenal in the effort to effectively engage the community as we implement and improve our plans. Such components include centralized communication, real-time open databases, converting services for digital consumption/application, and others.



Jerica Wants to See Future Development that Supports True Economic Empowerment

Learn more about expanding the tax base and industries for investment







What are Cobb's Greatest Needs?

Affordable Housing Options

Affordable housing options or subsidies for teachers and public service professionals

Enact and educate on gentrification-proofing allowances (Floating Homestead Exemption)

Expand Economy in Aging Population Areas

Establish more areas for mixed-use retail and residential

Market and promote museums and preservation areas

Mark areas for pop-up shops and small retail in walkable areas



Workforce Development

Strengthen Chamber of Commerce partnership for attracting targeted industries

Collaboration on workforce development initiatives with CC School Board

Student Housing to curtail future transience

More community centers to encourage commercial contribution

Community College and College Fairs

Invest in Small Businesses by Opening RFPs and Corporate Mixed-Use Deals

Compassionate Zoning

Study on zoning desirability

Economic brand for Cobb County

Formalize community representation in zoning deliberations

Identifying "Zoning Corridors" for growth








What does Cobb look like Today?




Opportunity Zones in Cobb County

Areas that have been identified as opportuntity zones deserve community engagement and planning that is broad. Plans must also ensure that they are highly connected to other parts of the county in order to facilitate commerce growth and community viability.

See full list here
More Information about Opportunity Zones

An opportunity zone is an economically-distressed community where new investments, under certain conditions, may be eligible for preferential tax treatment. Localities qualify as opportunity zones if they have been nominated for that designation by the state and that nomination has been certified by the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury via delegation of authority to the Internal Revenue Service.

Opportunity zones are designed to spur economic development by providing tax benefits to investors. First, investors can defer tax on any prior gains invested in a Qualified Opportunity Fund (QOF). If the QOF investment is held for longer than 5 years, there is a 10% exclusion of the deferred gain. If held for more than 7 years, the 10% becomes 15%. Second, if the investor holds the investment in the Opportunity Fund for at least ten years, the investor is eligible for an increase in basis of the QOF investment equal to its fair market value on the date that the QOF investment is sold or exchanged.

Definition provided by the IRS

Marietta-Zone 1

c
Visit map here

Marietta-Zone 2

c
Visit map here

Marietta-Zone 3

c
Visit map here

Smyrna

c
Visit map here

Acworth

c
Visit map here

Atlanta Road

c
Visit map here

Six Flags

c
Visit map here

Veterans Pkwy

c
Visit map here



Smart Communities Agenda

How can Cobb lead the country as a model for a thriving suburban area? Smart Cities (Smart Communities) initatives offer a multitude of ways to lead. Some aspects have already been embraced. Explore below.

How Smart is Our County?

If we assign a point system based on % outcome, we can set targets for becoming a leading smart county.

Security/Safety 75%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Disaster early-warning systems

Personal alert applications

Home security systems

Data-driven building inspections

Crowd Management


Opportunity for Adoption

Real-time crime mapping

Gunshot detection

Smart surveillance

Emergency response optimization

Body-worn cameras


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm

Predictive Policing

Healthcare 15%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Infectious disease surveillance


Opportunity for Adoption

Real-time air quality information

First aid alerts

Data-based public health interventions: maternal & child health

Telemedicine


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm

Remote patient monitoring

Lifestyle wearables

Data-based public health interventions: sanitation and hygiene

Online care search and scheduling

Integrated patient flow management systems



Mobility 50%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Real-time public transit information

Digital public transit payments

Intelligent traffic signals

Congestion pricing

Ride sharing

Bike sharing

Integrated multimodal information

Real-time road navigation


Opportunity for Adoption

Predictive maintenance of transportation infrastructure

Demand-based microtransit

Smart parking


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm

Autonomous vehicles

Parcel load pooling

Smart parcel lockers

E-hailing (private and pooled)

Energy/Environment (water, waste, etc.) 65%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Home energy automation

Home energy consumption tracking

Smart streetlights

Dynamic electricity pricing

Water consumption tracking

Smart irrigation


Opportunity for Adoption

Leakage detection and control

Water, air, and soil quality monitoring

Digital tracking and payment for waste disposal

Optimization of waste collection routes


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm



Economic Development & Housing35%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Digital business licensing and permitting

Digital business tax filing

Online retraining programs

Personalized education

Local e-career centers

Open cadastral database


Opportunity for Adoption

Digital land-use and building permitting

Peer-to-peer accommodation platforms


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm

Engagement & Community25%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Local connection platforms

Local civic engagement applications


Opportunity for Adoption

Digital citizen services


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm



"Economic development is the practice of ensuring the economic health of a community. Certain pressures such as infrastruture, communications, taxes, population growth, available housing, transportation, land availability, and local talent, can serve to bolster or inhibit economic development. We must be diligent and proactive in ensuring community, commerce, and government participation."

Jerica Richardson
Candidate for Cobb County Commissioner

Get Involved

Plug in to our volunteer hub!

LIVE.WORK.PLAY

[Live.Work.Play] is about connecting where we live, to where work, to where we play. That is what makes our community truly home. When we feel connected, we feel safe, secure, and a real opportunity for significance.

Live Work Play Vision

#OneCobb




Snapshot of Our County Government


0

Commissioners in Cobb County

0

Cities in Cobb County

0

School Board Districts

0

County Employees

0

County Funds ($millions)

0

Community Improvement Districts




The Board of Commissioners, the School Board, and City Government


No More Closed-Networking

There exists a difference between collaboration and networking. Collaboration involves truly working together for an objective and involves multiple parties. Many decisions made by our elected officials usually happen in a private room, off the record. While there is a time and a place for such discussion to occur, it is important that decisions on broad-impact projects should not be solely announced, but rather collectively developed. In today’s world, only those that have been exposed to how government works are involved. As a representative, it is an imperative that I meet people where they are.

Connecting Governing Bodies

Our Cobb delegation has much to be proud of, but we can do a better job in our transparency on roles, and creating opportunities for collective impact. In today's world, our planning commission and school board could collaborate more for more effective zoning. We can improve on planning assumptions such as the role that transient homes play in the broader ecosystem. We can coordinate to create grants, tax districts, and a pipeline for innovative pilots that could be modeled around metro Atlanta. Simply put, relationships matter and by proactively engaging in IGAs, there is so much that can be accomplished for the people we serve.

Increased Accessibility

Being a representative means being accessible to the community you are serving. Town halls should be dialogues, meetings should include mutiple layers of government, representatives should be able to help answer questions, and identify new ways to build relationships within the community. They should also serve as your representatvie to higher levels of office so that individuals should not have to compete with sanctioned lobbying firms with large bank accounts. Your representative should be willing to listen and be a real ally in making sure your concerns are heard. This is the culture I intend to bring to the Board of Commissioners.




What are the benefits to a Connected Government?

01
Save Taxpayer Money

When governing bodies are able to coordinate, we can leverage economies of scale, and prevent costs associated with overlapping/uncoordinated construction. Also, when coordinated, we can have better accounting of inventory so as not to spend costs associated with due diligence done by multiple groups.

02
Reduce Time to Completion

When coordinated, projects can be conducted more smoothly, and fewer delays caused by a lack of information.

03
Increased Accountability and Accuracy

Uncoordinated projects can result in loss of accountability for project completion and a lack of accurate timelines and costs. By coordinating governing groups and incentivizing collaboration, we can demand accountability for owning parties, and from third parties. Through coordination, we can also ensure that there are less chances of having a negative impact to a community.






FYI: Who Does What in Our County?



OneCobb is about having a vision and a united front about how we can serve as a model for Metro Atlanta. It begins by having our school board, board of commissioners, and city government correspond on one page when it comes to planning intiatives. It also takes coordination with state and federal level government in order to bring resources back into the county. To accomplish that, it takes respect, collaboration, and relationship. When we can do these things, there is so much that can be accomplished.

Jerica Richardson
Candidate for Cobb County Commissioner

Live Work Play Vision

3Ps of Public Service




Snapshot of Public Safety


0

Number of Departments in Public Saftey

0

(%) Decrease in Crime Rates

0

($K) Average Salary for Police

0

(%) of Fires Contained within Room of Origin

0

Per Capita Spending on Police and Fire Protection

0

Number of Community Programs




The Board of Commissioners and Civil Service


Proper Compensation (Pay)

Many of our public safety professionals work tirelessly, but have to pick up additional jobs just to make ends meet. We can all admit that good police work is not charity, and with higher pay, we can demand and maintain a higher quality staff. Pay should not just reflect time in service, but should also include the quality and consistency of training, experience, and impact to the community. As a part of compensation, we must incorporate new ways of supporting, acknowledging, and rewarding our public safety professionals.

Also, compensation also goes beyond recognition and salary. We can also ensure that our professionals have up-to-date training and technology to help improve their quality of life and safety. Every day when they leave the house, their families are on edge about whether they will return.

Community Engagement & Activities (Presence)

The shift we must accomplish is protecting and serving by reinforcing community. Reinforcing our community means our public safety professionals should have a more active role to play within the community beyond protection. In order to better integrate with the community, foster recruiting efforts, and improve the perception and effectiveness of the job, it is imperative that public safety professionals are encouraged to participate in community engagement workshops, local school activities, community service projects, and remain out front at community events (festivals, conferences, etc.). There should be a component of the job by which the community can provide feedback as well. We should not wait until a problem arises.

Working & Training in Collaboration with Social Programs (Partnership)

Our public safety department has partnered with other groups to conduct successful training programs for crime prevention and de-escalation. I am committed to strengthening such relationships in the areas of job-training, rehabilitation, engagement, de-escalation, crime prevention, leadership training, drug use, and trafficking. By establishing a relationship where the community and social professionals can provide information to our servants while our elected officials are able to empower our residents and visitors, we can foster a much safer community with better outcomes.

In addition, I am fully committed to decriminalizing certain non-violent activities and focusing on the rehabilitation and reacclimation of those that have been arrested.

Lastly, jails or detention centers that hold non-convicted persons should not include punishment-style behavior. Today, we are facing conditions that are well-below what would be considered humane. Poor quality water, sleep deprivation, lack of food, and limited administration of healthcare has led to the deaths while in custody. This is unacceptable, and I am committed to seeing this change, but the tone must change at the top. If we truly believe in innocence until proven guilty, then we must practice it. We must protect the rights of people, especially while in our custody.






Enforcing a Sense of "Community" through Public Safety Measures

Independent studies have identified a series of recommendations in order to ensure that our public safety professionals are positioned for success. Listed below are several recommendations highlighted in the studies. I am looking to listen and learn from our professionals managing CCPD and identify ways to navigate these recommendations.






Changing Our Relationships

Reemphasize community policing as a department strategy

Engage a co-production police model

Establish a formal role for the community/citizen advisory committee




Changing Our Priorities

Acknowledge and address public perception of racism and discriminatory policing

Prioritize criminal investigation staffing

Prioritize patrol staffing

Review and revise CCPD approach to traffic enforcement

Collect race contact and outcome data

Develop a LGBTQ+ policy




Changing Our Methods & Incentives

Increase pay for employees

Expand rewards and community incentive programs for employees

Review and revise the performance appraisal process

Ensure full and consistent staffing of public service technician positions

Increase mid and upper-level management training

Engage a more interactive and inclusive leadership style

Review disqualification policies and practices

Reinstitute the "Knock and Talk" philosophy (off-the-clock community engagement in neighborhoods)

Not identified in CCPD assessment, but important nonetheless: Expand the use of technologies that increase accountability and safety




Our public safety professionals have the important role of protecting and serving our community through the enforcement of laws and maintaining peace. It is a difficult and honorable job that many times serves to inspire. I am calling up on public servants to go one step further than the enforcement of laws, and that is to reinforce community. We can get there through pay, presence, and partnership efforts as we move into the future.

Jerica Richardson
Candidate for Cobb County Commissioner

Live Work Play Vision

Improving Mobility Options




Snapshot of Our Mobility


0

(%) Workers Commuting 30 Minutes or More

0

(%) Walkability Index Score in Comparison to Peers

0

(min) Average Travel Time

0

(%) loss in Economic Opportunity Due to Limited Mobility

0

(%) Drive Alone

0

Miles of Roads Being Managed




The Board of Commissioners and Mobility


Expanding Transit Options and Intelligence

Transit is more than just a conversation about the car. I am committed to having a conversation about expanded transit options and increased mobility. This means the end goal is to ensure that people from different communities can get from point A to point B in equitable, cost effective, and efficient ways. County-wide mobility means improved education opportunities, community engagement initatives, and sensible economic development. We also want to ensure we are leveraging the most user-friendly, sustainable technology that will improve our mobility as well.

Connecting Less Dense Areas to High Density Areas

Here in Cobb, we are experiencing growth and there are some areas around the county where that growth is more concentrated. In order to maintain that balance, it is necessary that we deploy measures that help build connections between less dense and high density areas. Internally, we can leverage trolleys and park and rides in less dense areas and commuter/light rail and buses in high density areas.

Engage & Enact Regional Plans

Cobb County and the Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) have developed an incredible 2040 plan which include a focus on regional connectivity. We have to make some tough decisions if we are to make it into reality. Mobility is a conversation about connecting ourselves internally, but also externally to other counties and nearby cities. If we are not thinking of Cobb as a part of a major artery in the region, then our economic viability will decrease dramatically.




Starting the Transit Conversation

When it comes to maneuvering from point A to point B, we have many options that we can consider. From today's current technologies to those of the future, our plans must be comprehensive.

Speed Rating 100%
Environmental Rating 0%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 50%
Qualified Mass Transit 0%
Density Threshold 0%
Distance Accommodated 100%
Use-Tax Offset 0%
User Experience 100%
Aesthetic Rating 50%
Speed Rating 100%
Environmental Rating 50%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 50%
Qualified Mass Transit 0%
Density Threshold 0%
Distance Accommodated 70%
Use-Tax Offset 0%
User Experience 100%
Aesthetic Rating 50%
Speed Rating 80%
Environmental Rating 70%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 0%
Qualified Mass Transit 100%
Density Threshold 100%
Distance Accommodated 100%
Use-Tax Offset 100%
User Experience 70%
Aesthetic Rating 50%
Speed Rating 80%
Environmental Rating 80%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 20%
Qualified Mass Transit 100%
Density Threshold 100%
Distance Accommodated 90%
Use-Tax Offset 100%
User Experience 70%
Aesthetic Rating 50%
Speed Rating 10%
Environmental Rating 100%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 20%
Qualified Mass Transit 0%
Density Threshold 30%
Distance Accommodated 0%
Use-Tax Offset 0%
User Experience 20%
Aesthetic Rating 70%
Speed Rating 100%
Environmental Rating 50%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 50%
Qualified Mass Transit 100%
Density Threshold 50%
Distance Accommodated 100%
Use-Tax Offset 100%
User Experience 50%
Aesthetic Rating 50%
Speed Rating 50%
Environmental Rating 100%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 100%
Qualified Mass Transit 0%
Density Threshold 0%
Distance Accommodated 30%
Use-Tax Offset 10%
User Experience 25%
Aesthetic Rating 100%
Speed Rating 100%
Environmental Rating 60%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 50%
Qualified Mass Transit 100%
Density Threshold 30%
Distance Accommodated 50%
Use-Tax Offset 100%
User Experience 90%
Aesthetic Rating 100%
Speed Rating 100%
Environmental Rating 0%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 50%
Qualified Mass Transit 100%
Density Threshold 50%
Distance Accommodated 100%
Use-Tax Offset 100%
User Experience 50%
Aesthetic Rating 50%
Speed Rating 100%
Environmental Rating 0%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 30%
Qualified Mass Transit 100%
Density Threshold 50%
Distance Accommodated 100%
Use-Tax Offset 100%
User Experience 50%
Aesthetic Rating 50%
Speed Rating 100%
Environmental Rating 0%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 100%
Qualified Mass Transit 0%
Density Threshold 50%
Distance Accommodated 60%
Use-Tax Offset 0%
User Experience 60%
Aesthetic Rating 60%
Speed Rating 100%
Environmental Rating 0%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 70%
Qualified Mass Transit 0%
Density Threshold 100%
Distance Accommodated 100%
Use-Tax Offset 100%
User Experience 100%
Aesthetic Rating 80%
Speed Rating 0%
Environmental Rating 100%
Cost Advantage (Build, Maintenance, Acquisition) 75%
Qualified Mass Transit 0%
Density Threshold 10%
Distance Accommodated 0%
Use-Tax Offset 0%
User Experience 100%
Aesthetic Rating 100%

From One Place to Another

Mobility Winners-Building Connections









Connecting to Fulton County

Mobility Options Under Consideration

Light Rail


Managed Lanes


Express Lanes


Connecting Internally

Mobility Options Under Consideration

Trolley


Sidewalks


Buses


Reversible Lanes


Two-Lane Tributaries


Sky Tunnels





Accommodating the Costs

MARTA expansion costs nearly $300M/mile which cannot be supported by either a TSPLOST or special tax district. Note, the technology is older, and there may be opportunities in testing new forms of transit. Regardless, in order to connect Cobb to Fulton, we must get creative by investing in new technologies and expanding our tax base.

Jerica's Stance on the Tax Increase
Learn More About the Budget and Expanding Our Tax Base

TSPLOST by referendum

Can bring an extra $150M to special transportation projects.

Limitations to Consider:

Most projects will benefit denser areas, while funding would also be supplied from less dense areas. Projects would have to focus on contributing tributaries by incorporating alternative forms of transit and the arterial routes.

HB930 Special Tax District

Can support local transit projects

Limitations to Consider:

Projects that benefit denser areas, but funding coming from less dense areas. Projects would have to focus on contributing tributaries by incorporating alternative forms of transit AND the arterial routes.

A portion of the county would have 7% tax while other areas would have a 6% tax, leading to incentivized sprawl and possible density changes in central and northern Cobb.






ARC and Cobb County's 2040 Vision for Transit and Growth

Read the full plan here.



Governing Agencies

Decisions about transportation are done in conjunction with many parties.

Georgia Department of Transportation

Cobb Department of Transportation

Cobb County Commissioners

ATL DOT

ATL Board

Georgia Legislative Delegation

Federal Department of Transportation

Atlanta Regional Commission





Leveraging 21st Century Transit Options


Technologies we are watching:

Expanded broadband infrastructure

Autonomous Cars, Shuttles, and Buses

Tunnel-based Transit

Water-fueled Cars

High-speed Rail

Maglev Trains

Transport Pods

Multi-purpose Vehicles (Commerce, delivery, transit)

Drone Delivery Technologies






With its abundance of parks, attractions, economic centers, low cost of living, and access to Atlanta, Cobb County has much to offer. However, without being able to get to where you need to be at the right time, it's only going to be harder for us to show up for economic and social opportunities.

Jerica Richardson
Candidate for Cobb County Commissioner

Live Work Play Vision

Zoning & Economic Development




Snapshot of Our Community's Economy


0

($K) Average Weekly Wage

0

(%) Unemployment Rate

0

($K) Median Household Income

0

(K) Employed Population

0

(+%) Difference in Cost of Living in Comparison to US Average

0

(%) Households with Internet Access




The Board of Commissioners and Economic Development


Equitable Revitalization (Gentrification-Proof Measures)

Balancing revitalization, growth, and gentrification is a delicate balance. By encouraging mixed-use and mixed-income zoning, transitional housing, subsidized funding for code upgrades, and incorporating an income-based tax credit for rapidly rising property values, gentrification can be mitigated in a meaningful way and members of the community that had been there prior to redevelopment can benefit from the changes.

Regional Development & Planning

The Atlanta Regional Commission (ARC) and our planning commission have drafted a 2040 plan which includes a study of local and regional trends. The plan provides economic development priorities, transit plans, and goals for every area of service for the county. I am committed to enabling and adhering to this plan as we move into the future. It is also an imperative that we evaluate our planning goals through the lens of leveraging new technologies and expanding specific areas of our economy: new industries (Research & intellectual property (IP)), industry collaboration, professional services, recreational activities, and tourism.

Smart Communities

SMART Communities is about enhancing the services being offered by the county and empowering the users of those services. I am committed to leveraging the SMART Communities arsenal in the effort to effectively engage the community as we implement and improve our plans. Such components include centralized communication, real-time open databases, converting services for digital consumption/application, and others.



Jerica Wants to See Future Development that Supports True Economic Empowerment

Learn more about expanding the tax base and industries for investment







What are Cobb's Greatest Needs?

Affordable Housing Options

Affordable housing options or subsidies for teachers and public service professionals

Enact and educate on gentrification-proofing allowances (Floating Homestead Exemption)

Expand Economy in Aging Population Areas

Establish more areas for mixed-use retail and residential

Market and promote museums and preservation areas

Mark areas for pop-up shops and small retail in walkable areas



Workforce Development

Strengthen Chamber of Commerce partnership for attracting targeted industries

Collaboration on workforce development initiatives with CC School Board

Student Housing to curtail future transience

More community centers to encourage commercial contribution

Community College and College Fairs

Invest in Small Businesses by Opening RFPs and Corporate Mixed-Use Deals

Compassionate Zoning

Study on zoning desirability

Economic brand for Cobb County

Formalize community representation in zoning deliberations

Identifying "Zoning Corridors" for growth








What does Cobb look like Today?




Opportunity Zones in Cobb County

Areas that have been identified as opportuntity zones deserve community engagement and planning that is broad. Plans must also ensure that they are highly connected to other parts of the county in order to facilitate commerce growth and community viability.

See full list here
More Information about Opportunity Zones

An opportunity zone is an economically-distressed community where new investments, under certain conditions, may be eligible for preferential tax treatment. Localities qualify as opportunity zones if they have been nominated for that designation by the state and that nomination has been certified by the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury via delegation of authority to the Internal Revenue Service.

Opportunity zones are designed to spur economic development by providing tax benefits to investors. First, investors can defer tax on any prior gains invested in a Qualified Opportunity Fund (QOF). If the QOF investment is held for longer than 5 years, there is a 10% exclusion of the deferred gain. If held for more than 7 years, the 10% becomes 15%. Second, if the investor holds the investment in the Opportunity Fund for at least ten years, the investor is eligible for an increase in basis of the QOF investment equal to its fair market value on the date that the QOF investment is sold or exchanged.

Definition provided by the IRS

Marietta-Zone 1

c
Visit map here

Marietta-Zone 2

c
Visit map here

Marietta-Zone 3

c
Visit map here

Smyrna

c
Visit map here

Acworth

c
Visit map here

Atlanta Road

c
Visit map here

Six Flags

c
Visit map here

Veterans Pkwy

c
Visit map here



Smart Communities Agenda

How can Cobb lead the country as a model for a thriving suburban area? Smart Cities (Smart Communities) initatives offer a multitude of ways to lead. Some aspects have already been embraced. Explore below.

How Smart is Our County?

If we assign a point system based on % outcome, we can set targets for becoming a leading smart county.

Security/Safety 75%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Disaster early-warning systems

Personal alert applications

Home security systems

Data-driven building inspections

Crowd Management


Opportunity for Adoption

Real-time crime mapping

Gunshot detection

Smart surveillance

Emergency response optimization

Body-worn cameras


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm

Predictive Policing

Healthcare 15%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Infectious disease surveillance


Opportunity for Adoption

Real-time air quality information

First aid alerts

Data-based public health interventions: maternal & child health

Telemedicine


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm

Remote patient monitoring

Lifestyle wearables

Data-based public health interventions: sanitation and hygiene

Online care search and scheduling

Integrated patient flow management systems



Mobility 50%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Real-time public transit information

Digital public transit payments

Intelligent traffic signals

Congestion pricing

Ride sharing

Bike sharing

Integrated multimodal information

Real-time road navigation


Opportunity for Adoption

Predictive maintenance of transportation infrastructure

Demand-based microtransit

Smart parking


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm

Autonomous vehicles

Parcel load pooling

Smart parcel lockers

E-hailing (private and pooled)

Energy/Environment (water, waste, etc.) 65%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Home energy automation

Home energy consumption tracking

Smart streetlights

Dynamic electricity pricing

Water consumption tracking

Smart irrigation


Opportunity for Adoption

Leakage detection and control

Water, air, and soil quality monitoring

Digital tracking and payment for waste disposal

Optimization of waste collection routes


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm



Economic Development & Housing35%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Digital business licensing and permitting

Digital business tax filing

Online retraining programs

Personalized education

Local e-career centers

Open cadastral database


Opportunity for Adoption

Digital land-use and building permitting

Peer-to-peer accommodation platforms


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm

Engagement & Community25%

Currently Implemented or Under Construction/Discussion

Local connection platforms

Local civic engagement applications


Opportunity for Adoption

Digital citizen services


Not for Consideration/Needs More Research/May Cause Harm






Economic development is the practice of ensuring the economic health of a community. Certain pressures such as infrastruture, communications, taxes, population growth, available housing, transportation, land availability, and local talent, can serve to bolster or inhibit economic development. We must be diligent and proactive in ensuring community, commerce, and government participation.

Jerica Richardson
Candidate for Cobb County Commissioner




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